EQ Life Masthead - 2019
RSS
enews
live TV (up)
photo galleries (up)
video galleries (up)
subscriptions
EQ Life Magazine
12 month subscription
BLOG: Welcoming a new edition

Emma Booth's new partner, Sabi. Photo supplied.

Emma Booth's new partner, Sabi.

Photo supplied.

 

By Emma Booth

When we are lucky enough to have special horses come into our lives, it's our responsibility to recognise that this is exactly what we are - lucky. Great horses don’t come around every day, and finding horses that you really connect with are extremely hard to come by. Finding horses we really "click" with is such an important part of a successful competition combination. You can have an extremely talented horse, and a super experienced rider, but if there isn't a bond between the two, it’s never going to be a really exciting prospect. Certain horses can sometimes leave us with hard decisions to make - particularly if we discover that there isn’t really a connection there - but at the end of the day, the only way to enjoy your horse is when you understand one another.

Zidane is obviously a one in a million horse that I believe was meant to come into my life exactly when he did. We have an unflappable bond that allows us to be completely on the same level and truly understand one another.

Earlier this year, certain events unfolded and because of changing circumstances, new people came into my life. It’s because of these reasons I’ve also been extremely lucky to have recently gained the ride on another talented and willing gelding, Wasabi Sun. This beautiful big boy is owned by my lovely groom, Raquel Wright. Although this horse is very different to Zidane in many ways, what works for me with this horse is his extremely willing nature. He isn't as naturally forward thinking as Zidane so initially I wasn't one hundred percent sure we would work as a combination, or that he would adapt to my riding style, but because of his willingness to understand and please, and also his extremely quiet temperament, he has adapted extremely well. It has taken a little longer than it did with Zidane for us to come up with a language or set of aids that works for us, but Sabi is now much more understanding of travelling forward on his own without my leg as a reinforcing aid. We have also taken the time to get him a lot fitter which makes the work easier for him and therefore easier for me also.

 

Sabi is certainly easy on the eye! Photo supplied.

Sabi is certainly easy on the eye!

Photo supplied.



Sabi and I have been working together for a few months now and the timing couldn't have worked better with Zidane just having had colic surgery and being out of action. This has given me the opportunity to continue competing and will also give me the chance to still compete at Nationals at Boneo Park in October. He is a really fun horse that I really enjoy riding. He has such a docile nature so I always feel very safe with him. He is very beautiful to look at which is a bonus for the dressage ring, and also works in a very calm manner which allows for a consistent and safe test which helps get some good marks.

 

Sabi and Emma have been working together for a few months now. Photo supplied.

Sabi and Emma have been working together for a few months now.

Photo supplied.



Sabi and I have only had two starts together, one at Treehaven and one at Boneo Park where he scored a very decent 69.7%. There is still a lot of room for improvement so I’m really positive about us as a combination and extremely grateful to the lovely Raquel for trusting me with the ride on her gorgeous boy and for helping me every step of the way - we couldn’t do any of it without her.

If all goes to plan, Zidane will be back in full work at the beginning of December, and I will compete both Zidane and Sabi at Boneo CDI in January, and at the Sydney CDI in April next year. This will give me the best chance at qualifying for the World Equestrian Games held in America in September next year.

 

Sabi in action. Photo supplied.

Sabi in action.

Photo supplied.

 

READ THE LATEST NEWS ARTICLES HERE  

   

Issue 38

Back to top. Printable View.