EQ Life Masthead - 2019
RSS
enews
live TV (up)
EQ Life virtual competition
CMH.TV advert (V2)
subscriptions
EQ Life Magazine
12 month subscription
The challenge of treating HPSD

This article first appeared in the May 2023 digital edition of Equestrian Life. To see what's in the current issue, click here.

 One of the more common causes of chronic lameness is hindlimb proximal suspensory desmopathy (HPSD).

One of the more common causes of chronic lameness is hindlimb proximal suspensory desmopathy (HPSD).

 

The challenge of treating HPSD

By Dr Maxine Brain

Hindlimb lameness is frustrating to deal with, regardless of the type of equine discipline we are involved with. Proximal suspensory desmopathies of the hind limb can be challenging to treat.

One of the more common causes of chronic lameness is hindlimb proximal suspensory desmopathy (HPSD). Chronic referring to the continuous nature of the problem, as this is seldomly a problem diagnosed, treated, and resolved within a couple of weeks. It can start as an acute (sudden) lameness, but persist as an ongoing, performance-limiting lameness that may never resolve completely. Desmopathy equates to the disease of a ligament.

The hindlimb suspensory ligament (SL) is a ligament that attaches to the back of the cannon bone, just below the hock joint, and extends down the cannon where it bifurcates into medial (inside) and lateral (outside) branches, that each insert onto their respective sesamoid bones at the back of the fetlock. It is well tucked in between the hind splint bones and is covered by the superficial and deep digital flexor tendons. The body and the branches of the hindlimb SL are easily palpated but the proximal (upper) origin of the hind SL is not. The SL is part of the suspensory apparatus that is responsible for supporting the fetlock during movement.

Hind SLs are less commonly affected with pathology compared to the SLs in the forelimbs, but once affected they are often harder to manage than forelimb SL injuries...

Read the full article in the May 2023 issue of Equestrian Life magazine here.

 

M_Ad_out_now_94 

Back to top. Printable View.